AISS Conveners

Professor David Cooper
Director, The Kirby Institute, University of New South Wales
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David Cooper AO, Scientia Professor of Medicine at the University of New South Wales, a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science (FAA) and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences (FAAHMS), is Director of the Kirby Institute for infection and immunity in society, Sydney, Australia. The Kirby Institute is funded by the Australian Government to conduct research into the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Australia, with the ultimate aim of reducing the burden of the HIV/AIDS epidemic for the affected community. Kirby Institute work also includes extensive research into viral hepatitis, HIV biomedical prevention studies, laboratory-based research, sexual health, indigenous health, and numerous international collaborations. Professor Cooper’s previous positions include President of the International AIDS Society (IAS) and Chairman of the World Health Organisation-UNAIDS HIV Vaccine Advisory Committee (VAC). He is a former Director of HIV-NAT, a clinical research and trials collaboration based at the Thai Red Cross AIDS Research Centre at the Chulalongkorn University Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand. Currently, he is leading several large international clinical trials and cohorts to optimise antiretroviral therapy (ART) in low and middle-income countries. He has been author or co-author on more than 800 peer-reviewed publications, has served on the editorial boards of many journals, and maintains a clinical practice at St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney.
Professor Herawati Soedoyo
Deputy for Fundamental Research, Principal Investigator and Senior Research Fellow, Eijkman Institute for Molecular Biology
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Dr Sudoyo’s research interests include energy-transducing membranes and complex diseases, human genome diversity and disease epidemiology, and forensic DNA. After successfully using DNA markers to identify the perpetrators of the 2004 Australian Embassy bombing, Dr Sudoyo established the Forensic DNA Laboratory at the Eijkman Institute, receiving a Wing of Honour for Police Medicine for this work. She also received the 2008 Habibie Award in recognition of her contribution to advances in medicine and biotechnology and the 2008 Australian Alumni Award for Scientific and Research Innovation. Dr Sudoyo has conducted research on the links between genome diversity in Indonesian populations and disease resistance and susceptibility and has used DNA studies to trace migration, demonstrating links between human populations in Madagascar and Indonesia. Dr Sudoyo has an MD and MSc from Universitas Indonesia and a PhD from Monash University. She is also an Honorary Associate Professor at Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney.
Professor Ove Hoegh-Guldberg
Professor of Marine Science and Director, Global Change Institute, University of Queensland
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Professor Ove Hoegh-Guldberg (BScHons., Sydney; PhD., UCLA) is the inaugural Director of the University of Queensland’s Global Change Institute (GCI) in Brisbane. The GCI focuses on the challenges that face humanity with respect to healthy oceans, food security, clean energy and sustainable water. Professor Hoegh-Guldberg also leads an active research group that is focused on the biology of coral reefs and the marine impacts of climate change, and is one of the most cited scientists on climate change with over 300 peer-reviewed publications. He is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, coordinating lead author of the IPCC (AR5), and has been recognised by a Eureka Prize in 1999 and the Prince Albert II of Monaco Climate Change Award in 2014.
Professor Jamaluddin Jompa
Dean, Faculty of Marine Science and Fisheries, Universitas Hasanuddin
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Jamaluddin Jompa was born in South Sulawesi, Indonesia. He graduated from McMaster University, Canada, with a master’s degree in 1996, and was awarded a PhD from James Cook University, Queensland in 2001. Professor Jompa is a senior lecturer and currently serves as Dean of the Faculty of Marine Sciences and Fisheries at Universitas Hasanuddin (Hasanuddin University). From 2004 to 2013, he served as Director of the Research and Development Centre for Marine, Coasts and Small Islands at Universitas Hasanuddin. In 2007, Professor Jompa was seconded to the Indonesian Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries to manage the national Coral Reef Rehabilitation and Management Program Phase II (COREMAP-II). Professor Jompa is the President of the Indonesian Young Academy of Sciences, and chaired the study committee for Indonesian Science Agenda (SAINS45), which sets out the key questions facing Indonesia as it approaches its centenary of Independence in 2045. He is also Chairman of the South Sulawesi Sea Partnership Program, President of the Association of Diving School International—Indonesia, and a member of the National Fisheries Stock Assessment Committee.
Dr Jim Peacock
CSIRO Fellow and Distinguished Professor, University of Technology Sydney
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Dr Jim Peacock (AC, FAA, FRS, FTSE, FAIAST) is a Fellow in CSIRO and a Distinguished Professor at University of Technology Sydney. Dr Peacock was Australia’s Chief Scientist from March 2006-August 2008. Dr Peacock is an outstanding scientist with a record of academic excellence and is highly respected by the science, engineering and technology community. He was President of the Australian Academy of Science from 2002 - 2006. Dr Peacock is an award winning molecular biologist and fervent science advocate. He is recognised internationally as an eminent researcher in the field of plant molecular biology and its applications in agriculture. Dr Peacock is a strong advocate for the integration of science and global business. He drives innovative communication efforts to inform the general public as to the outcomes and value of modern science. He has brought the excitement of science to a broad cross-section of the community and to Australian school students.
Dr TJ Higgins
CSIRO Honorary Fellow
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TJ Higgins’ research interest is the application of biotechnology for plant improvement. He is particularly interested in protecting legumes from insect pests and enhancing the nutritional quality of plant products for feed and food uses. Dr Higgins has made contributions to our knowledge of seed protein biology, to the development of biotechnological techniques for grain and pasture legume improvement and to the development of grain legumes that are protected from coleopteran and lepidopteran insect damage both in the field and during storage. His focus is on international agriculture, especially in Africa and India.
Associate Professor Fenny Dwivany
School of Life Sciences and Technology, Institut Teknologi Bandung
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Fenny Dwivany was awarded her PhD in biology from the University of Melbourne in 2003. She is an associate professor at the School of Life Sciences and Technology at Institut Teknologi Bandung (Bandung Institute of Technology). Her group dubs itself the ‘banana group’, due to its research interest in bananas (www.thebananagroup.org). Its projects focus on big data using a multi-omics approach that correlates biodiversity, disease and fruit ripening, as well as examining the use of advanced nanomaterials as bio-fungicides, and edible coatings to delay fruit ripening. Her group is also involved in the Space Seeds for Asian Future program which was Indonesia’s first space biology experiment. Dr Dwivany has been awarded an International L'Oréal-UNESCO for Women in Science Fellowship (2007), an Australia Award (2010), the Schlumberger Foundation Faculty for the Future Award (2011), the Science and Technology Award (2012) from the Indonesian Government, and the Karya Inovasi Award (2015) from Institut Teknologi Bandung.
About

The Australia-Indonesia Science Symposium seeks to promote scientific collaboration and exchange, and strengthen people-to-people links between the two countries. The Symposium builds on existing links and partnerships between Australian and Indonesian scientists, universities and public research institutions.

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Venue

The Australian Academy of Science's Shine Dome was purpose-built in 1958–59 to house the Academy. The building was created to reflect the inquiring and innovative nature of science. It was the first Canberra building to be added to the National Heritage List, for its historical and architectural significance.

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Indonesian noodles - made from Australian wheat, exported to the world. Lezat! @StevenCiobo @Austrade - @DubesAustralia
Paul Grigson @DubesAustralia. 1h
Indonesian noodles - made from Australian wheat, exported to the world. Lezat! @StevenCiobo @Austrade - @DubesAustralia